I have a large double concrete laundry sink that I'm putting in my kitchen.  Since we are now planning on concrete counters I'm feeling like it's a lot of gray in the room and was wondering if there was any way to paint the sink white for a large "farmhouse sink" feel. 

Does anyone have any thoughts on this?  I've been in the decorative art industry for years and am comfortable with numerous products including 2 part expoxys so I'm not afraid of a challenge.  I was thinking of using a paint and counter top sealer from one of the faux finishing companies that I've had excellent results with for counter tops, but thought maybe there is a way to do this that might hold up better and someone on here would know.

ANY advice would be greatly apreciated!  Thank you.

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Pour the sink with white concretet

depends on what you mean by "paint". In my opinion it is to hard to turn gray concrete into white concrete. Going lighter over darker doesn't work as well as darker over light. however, it might be possible to use some of those thick epoxy floor sealers with a white tint and go over the whole thing.....probably several times to get complete coverage. I don't think regular concrete sealer will stick to regular paint so I think the way to go is to use a tinted sealer or epoxy.

Thank you Guido,

Yes I was looking into some of the epoxy floor sealers for garage floors, etc., and some of the re-enamel paint coatings and thinking of just covering the whole sink to look white but I am concerned about how they'll hold up so after some more research I think we are going to just pour white concrete counters and leave the sink it's natural gray for better long term.  Thanks for confirming what I was considering.



Guido said:

depends on what you mean by "paint". In my opinion it is to hard to turn gray concrete into white concrete. Going lighter over darker doesn't work as well as darker over light. however, it might be possible to use some of those thick epoxy floor sealers with a white tint and go over the whole thing.....probably several times to get complete coverage. I don't think regular concrete sealer will stick to regular paint so I think the way to go is to use a tinted sealer or epoxy.

You are asking about what is known as "resurfacing".  Normally resurfacing is not done over concrete sinks but the materials and their performance is the same.

First of all, I resurface bath tubs, countertops, sinks, etc. for a living.  So take this from me - do not ever resurface.  It is a cheap ass way to get a shiny look.  Yes, if it is done properly the coatings will hold 10 even 20 years.  But that also depends on how the sink is used.  Lots of dishwashing, banging things in the sink, dropping... the coatings will deteriorate.  

Anyway - resurfacing is most profitable in old apartment complexes. Slums that is.  Do you want to have the same "technology" in your house or a house that is not a slum?   I would not.

Ok, here how resurfacing is done properly:
1. Prepare the surface
That is either acid etching (for porcelain) or sanding with 80 -120 grit sandpaper (cultured marble sinks and such).  The sanding is one step - no need to make the surface completely scratch free.  The primer and top coat will hide it all.

2. Wipe with lacquer thinner. 
Removes minor dust and any oils that maybe present.

3. Use an HVLP gun to spray a primer (epoxy) and top coat (normally it is a polyurethane.  Better find an "acrylic polyurethane" - a bit of a strange product, but it holds way way better.

4. Spray the epoxy primer in at least 3 coats letting them tack before the next one.  
Make the surface completely smooth by applying enough epoxy.

5.  You can NOT just leave the epoxy as a final coat.  It will yellow, no matter what people say about some special epoxies they sell.  Plus it scratches way easier than polyurethane or acrylic polyurethane.

6. Let the last epoxy coat set to the touch.

7. Spray top coat.  Same thing - first coat is very light.  It serves as "glue" for the next coats so they have less chance of running (thick areas that drip down). Spray the next 2 coats.  Last coat is the final look.  If you have high quality top coat that is what you will be seeing for years - they do not deteriorate.


Resurfacing is done best by a professional.  It involves a lot of masking and knowing some tricks that only a professional will know.  Sinks are the hardest to spray too because of the tight angles.

Once again - it is a cheap trick to get a new look instead of actually getting the real sink.  But if it is done right AND used right it will last for many, may years.

Final note - check out IKEA.  They have a white porcelain farm sink for about $150 if I am not mistaken. I'd go for it instead of resurfacing.


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