Hello Ladies and gentlemen, i'm posting this question bcs i would love some feedback from you all in the matter of casting this bar top and support in place. I have to do so, bcs after pouring the bar area, i have to place self levelling on the floor to create a continuous surface between the bar and the floor. So my question is, what is the best way to form the mold for this piece? Has curves in horizontal and vertical axis, so i thought eps foam or textile will do the trick, but then again don't know what i'll be fighting against here, since i've never done something like this. Brandon, Mark, Jeff, Tommy and Alla i know you can provide your experience, among all the others i don't know, to make me succeed in this project. Thanks to all.

 

P.S. the red marked area is the bar area and column i have to build.

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IMO Your fighting against "Head pressure" in your mould design and  and obtaining a seamless casting surface.

All other things equal ,the present skill to build on this scale, mix design and budget etc.

 

Budget limits material choice both in casting material and mould material most times.

 

"So direct solutions to this depend on budget and I cant assume yours" is what i tell my clients.

 

Casting in place is like precasting to me, yes there is more of a challeng getting set up onsite but iv done it, and you have to finish the top so thats no as easy as it might seem.

Building the mould is not so different.

 

Big Red @ Mandala is top of the dial for this king of work!! he does this in his sleep........

 

If you like ring me up i can relate my experience precasting pcs this size routinely in the plant

Peace.

480.299.0704

 

How would I do this? Ferrocement.  Make an armature out of rebar and steel studs, or whatever it takes to get the shapes you want, cover it with wire, and spread some mud on it.  Not everything has to be casted against a mold, sometimes you have to think outside the box.  Thats just how I would approach it, I know some of these folks on here have better methods and can do it in their sleep like Mr. Ralston said. Good luck, if you can pull it off, it will be very impressive! 

I would tend to agree with Chuck.  One thing to remember is that thisis going to be very heavy, so if you pour it in place, make sure that you have the support.  And DON"T take on the responsibility of that, tell them to engineer it and get a sign off.  "sculpting" it, like Chuck is talking about could be a very good route, but you need to have some finish skills to do it good.

Please clatify exactly why you need to cast in place.  Why can't you set the bar (precast) in place, and then run the floor leveler up to it and create the transition.  I need a little more info on this to comment.  Remember, just because they want it a certain way, does not mean they can have it.  Like Jim said, it will come down to their budget.  Money can buy you many things, but if it is not in the budget, than they can't have it the way they want it and need to consider other options.

 

If you do need to pour it in place, I would lend your thinking to skateboard ramps.  Creating ribs to the exact shape and size and then skin them with a flexible board.  You do have to think about pressures on the forms and structure to hold it solid.  This is no kids game on this one.  You have a lot of moving parts to think about.

 

As for the column, I need more info as well.  My first thought is that it to needs to be precast.  If it is warping a steel beam support, and is not structural, then it will not be so difficult.  If it is to support the steel beam support, then you have a lot of work ahead of you to have it engineered properly.

 

I hope this helps.  May not be able to help much more for a week or so with the show, training, and artist collaboration I am doing this week.  Good Luck my friend!!

Paolo,

 

If your interested in Ferrocenent, a good friend of mine Carl Sinelli has been doing this for 40yrs or so.

He has two Strawbail homes and severial Ferrocement homes here in Gold Canyon where I live.

 

Im over there regular working with him on his hydro garden and concrete stuff, hes just down the street and im sure he would help out.

 

Let me know and Ill hook you guys up!

jim

I thought about it some more, I know I didnt answer your question because your question was, how to form and pour.  Another option, which may sound counterintuitive, would be to make up a plug of the piece using fabric forming techniques.  Then, make multi-part fiberglass molds.  You could pour the bottom, then the front, then the top in sections. I just think it would be a nightmare trying to "pour" that, but it can be done.  I guess you could also make a plug using alla's method, just reversed.  Have offsets made of the profile and skin it, just like making a wooden boat.
Sorry i didn't replied earlier. Thanks for all your comments. Definitely they opened my eyes on a few things to take care of. As i told Jim, this is probably one of my last projects, if not the last one, and want to finish with a bang. Thxs for everything and i'll be checking every now and then. Concrete venom got me, anyways.

Jim Ralston said:

Paolo,

 

If your interested in Ferrocenent, a good friend of mine Carl Sinelli has been doing this for 40yrs or so.

He has two Strawbail homes and severial Ferrocement homes here in Gold Canyon where I live.

 

Im over there regular working with him on his hydro garden and concrete stuff, hes just down the street and im sure he would help out.

 

Let me know and Ill hook you guys up!

jim

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